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Guantánamo Kid: The True Story of Mohammed El-Gharani

Words by Jérôme Tubiana

Art by Alexandre Franc

Paperback with flaps, 168 pp, $24.99

Saudi Arabia offers few prospects for the bright young Mohammed El-Gharani. With roots in Chad, Mohammed is treated like a second-class citizen. His access to healthcare and education are restricted; nor can he make the most of his entrepreneurial spirit. At the age of 14, having scraped together some money as a street trader, Mohammed seizes an opportunity to study in Pakistan.

One Friday in Karachi, Mohammed is detained during a raid on his local mosque. After being beaten and interrogated, he is sold to the American government by Pakistani forces as a member of Al-Qaida with links to Osama Bin Laden. Mohammed has heard of neither. Under the custody of the US Army, he is flown first to Kandahar and then to Guantánamo Bay. In this landmark work of graphic non-fiction, Jérôme Tubiana and Alexandre Franc tell the eye-opening, heart-wrenching story of one of the Bay’s youngest detainees.

Written in collaboration with Mohammed El-Gharani, Guantánamo Kid reflects as closely as possible his memories and experiences of life in the camp.

This book is endorsed by Amnesty International.


Alexandre Franc


Born in 1973, Alexandre Franc grew up in Lyon. Since 2007, he has published over a dozen graphic novels, sometimes as a solo creator (Victor et l'Ourours from Actes Sud – l'An 2), sometimes as an artist (Mai 68. Histoire d’un Printemps, with Arnaud Bureau, Berg International), sometimes as a writer (Les Satellites, with Claire de Gastold, Gallimard) and sometimes in collaboration with a writer (Cher Régis Debray, Futuropolis). He is also an illustrator for youth periodicals, educational books and the communications industry. He lives in Paris with his wife and their two children.

Jérôme Tubiana


Jérôme Tubiana is a journalist and researcher. He has contributed to National Geographic and Foreign Affairs, among other publications. He first met Mohammed El-Gharani in N’Djamena in 2011, two years after his release from Guantánamo Bay. They met every afternoon for two weeks, after which Tubiana turned their conversations into a diary piece for the London Review of Books.